Can he get rid of haraam wealth by giving it to someone who wants to get married?

I had a haram income in the past. I asked you what I shall do with this money, as I wanted to give it as sadaqah to one of my relatives. You answered me by saying that it is fine to use this money as I did not know that it is haram when I earned it, or to give some or all of it as sadaqah.
I am intending to give this money as sadaqah to one of my relatives as he is about to get married, is this permissible or not? He asked me to lend him some money but -unfortunately- he does not have enough to return it to me.

Praise be to Allaah.

In the answer to your first question (no. 96614) we stated that whatever of this money is still in your possession should be spent on charitable causes, and you should not make use of it. In that question we referred to another question, which says that is it permissible for the penitent to make use of some of the haram money if he is in need. See question no. 78289.

Undoubtedly one of the ways of doing good is helping the one who wants to get married so that he can remain chaste. Based on this, there is nothing wrong with giving this money or some of it to your relative who is going to get married.

This is not regarded as charity or zakaah on your part, rather it is ridding yourself of haraam wealth. As for charity and zakaah, they can only be given from halaal wealth, because Allaah is Good and does not accept anything but that which is good.

We ask Allaah to help you and guide you.

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

Adding another rak’ah to the imaam’s witr because one wants to pray some more

Some people, when they pray witr with the imaam and he says salaam, they get up and do another rak’ah, because they want to do more prayers before praying witr later in the night. What is the ruling on this action? Is it considered to be forsaking the prayer with the imaam?

Praise be to Allaah.

We do not see anything wrong with this, and the ‘ulama’ stated that there is nothing wrong with doing this, so that his witr will be at the end of the night. He will be considered to have prayed with the imaam until he finished, because he stayed with him until he finished, and added another rak’ah for a shar’i reason, which was so that he could pray witr later in the night. There is nothing wrong with this, and it does not mean that he did not stay with the imaam until he finished, but he did not finish with him – he delayed it a little longer. Continue reading

A traveller wants to join two prayers but he thinks it most likely that he will reach his city before the end of the time for the second one

What is the ruling on someone who wants to join two prayers whilst travelling, offering the two prayers at the time of the first one, knowing that he thinks it most likely that he will reach his city before the time of the second prayer ends? What does he have to do if he arrives whilst the prayer is being offered in the mosque?.

Praise be to Allaah.

So long as a person is travelling, he may join prayers, even if he is going to arrive in his city before the time of the second obligatory prayer begins, but in this case it is better not to join the prayers, because joining prayers is only to be done when there is a need for it. This man who knows that he will arrive before the time of the second prayer begins does not need to join the prayers. Nevertheless, if he does that, there is nothing wrong with it. If he arrives when the time for the prayer has not yet begun, then he has discharged his obligation and he does not have to pray, because he offered the prayer by joining it with the first prayer. End quote.

Shaykh Muhammad ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him). Continue reading

Should he say the adhaan if he wants to pray on his own in the mosque?

If I have missed the prayer in congregation and I am in the mosque, should I say the adhaan or just the iqaamah?.

Praise be to Allaah.

The scholars are agreed that the one who enters the mosque and prays alone does not have to say the adhaan or iqaamah, and that the adhaan and iqaamah of the muezzin in the mosque are sufficient for him.

Imam al-Shaafa’i (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in al-Umm (1/106):

I do not know of any disagreement with the view that if a person comes to the mosque when the imam has finished praying, he may pray without any adhaan or iqaamah. End quote.

It is mustahabb for him to say the iqaamah before beginning to pray, and it is best if he says the adhaan and iqaamah, because the adhaan and iqaamah are dhikr or remembrance of Allaah. This idea was indicated by Qataadah (may Allaah have mercy on him) when he said: Nothing but good will come to you from testifying that there is no god but Allaah and that Muhammad is the Messenger of Allaah.

It is proven that Anas (may Allaah be pleased with him) entered the mosque when they had finished praying, and he told a man to say the adhaan and iqaamah. Narrated by al-Bukhaari in a mu’allaq report and by Ibn Abi Shaybah in al-Musannaf (1/250). Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Tamaam al-Minnah (p. 150).

Sa’eed ibn al-Musayyab said concerning people who came to the mosque when the prayer had ended: they should say the adhaan and iqaamah. This is the view of Imam al-Shaafa’i (may Allaah have mercy on him).

See: Mughni al-Muhtaaj (1/318) and al-Nawawi in al-Majmoo’ (3/93).

Ibn Qudaamah said in al-Mughni (2/74): It is better for each worshipper to say the adhaan and iqaamah, unless he is making up a missed prayer or at a time other than the time of the adhaan, in which case he should not say it out loud. End quote.

i.e., so that he will not confuse the people with his adhaan.

He also said (2/79):

If a person enters the mosque where the prayer has already been offered, if he wishes he may say the adhaan and iqaamah. This was stated by Ahmad.

And if he wishes he may pray without any adhaan or iqaamah, because ‘Urwah said: If he comes to the mosque when the people have already prayed and said the adhaan and iqaamah, then their adhaan and iqaamah will suffice for those who come after them. This is the view of al-Hasan, al-Sha’bi and al-Nakha’i, but al-Hasan said: It is better, in their view, to say the iqaamah.

If he says the adhaan it is mustahabb for him to say it quietly and not out loud, so that the people will not be confused by an adhaan that is given at a time other than the usual time. End quote.

See also the answer to question no. 5660 and 6130.

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

She has made up the prayers that she missed when she was younger and wants to carry on making them up

My mother did not pray for several years when she was young, and when she heard from one of the shaykhs that it is obligatory to make up missed prayers, she regretted it and repented, and she promised Allaah that she would make up the prayers that she had missed so long as she lived. In fact she has fulfilled her promise and has made up for all the years during which she did not pray. But she says to us: “I have to keep on praying because I said when I made a promise to my Lord, ‘as long as I live’ and I am still alive.” She offers the obligatory prayers and not the naafil prayers, although she knows that she hads offered all the prayers that she missed. Is what she is doing correct? Is it regarded as a vow?.

Praise be to Allaah.

The majority of fuqaha’ are of the view that the one who does not pray for a while after he reaches puberty has to make up the prayers that he missed. If he does not know how many prayers he missed, then he should do what he thinks is most likely the number of prayers that he missed.

It should be noted that the prayers that she missed when she was young, before reaching puberty, do not have to be made up, because she was not accountable at that time.

Some scholars are of the view that whoever deliberately misses prayers does not have to make them up; all he has to do is repent and do good deeds in the future.

See the answers to questions no. 7969 and 72216.

Anyway, what is required of your mother is to seek forgiveness a great deal, repent and do naafil deeds in the hope that Allaah will accept her repentance. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“And verily, I am indeed forgiving to him who repents, believes (in My Oneness, and associates none in worship with Me) and does righteous good deeds, and then remains constant in doing them (till his death)”

[Ta-Ha 20:82]

With regard to her saying that she made a promise to Allaah to make up the missed prayers for as long as she lives, this is a vow to make up the prayers that she missed, and she has done that and fulfilled that vow. So she does not have to continue making up prayers that she has in fact made up, because a prayer can only be made up once.

As for her saying “as long as I am still alive”, it seems that what is meant by this expression is that she will continue to fulfil her vow as long as she is still alive, and she will never stop making up prayers because of sickness, being busy or any other reason that may distract her from praying.

If she wants to carry on praying, this is a good deed that was encouraged by the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) when he said: “Prayer is the best thing prescribed, so whoever can offer a great deal of it let him do so” (narrated by al-Tabaraani in Saheeh al-Jaami’ (3870)) – so long as that is done with the intention of offering naafil prayers, not with the intention of making up missed prayers.

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

If a person wants to cancel his intention whilst doing wudoo’, praying or fasting

The great scholar al-Sa’di says in al-Fataawa al-Sa’diyyah (p. 228): Cancelling one’s intention with regard to acts of worship is of two types: one which does not have any effect, which is after the act of worship has been completed. … The second is cancelling the intention for the acts of worship when one is still doing it. … This means that the act of worship is not valid.
Does this mean that if it occurs to me to break an obligatory fast, my fast becomes invalid? What if that occurs to me but I do not form the intention to break my fast, is that o.k.? What is the ruling on that? Similarly in the case of wudoo’, if in the middle of it I begin to doubt whether there is some urine there, for example, then I do not find any. Sometimes I form the intention to stop doing wudoo’, then I go back and complete it after not finding anything. Should I start again from scratch because I stopped intending wudoo’ in this case?.

Praise be to Allaah.

If a person forms the intention to stop doing an act of worship whilst he is doing it, it becomes invalid. No exception is made except in the case of Hajj and ‘umrah, which do not become invalid if the intention is cancelled or even if a person declares that he is going to stop. Rather the muhrim remains in ihraam until he has completed the rituals or he exits ihraam because of being prevented from continuing.

It says in al-Mughni (1/278): If he started his prayer with a sound intention, then he forms the intention to stop praying and exit from it, then it becomes invalid. This was the view of al-Shaafa’i. End quote.

It says in Zaad al-Mustanqi’ in the chapter on prayer: If he decides to end his prayer whilst praying or he becomes hesitant, then his prayer is invalidated. In the chapter on fasting he said: The one who forms the intention to break the fast has broken the fast.

But Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in al-Sharh that hesitating about ending the prayer does not make the prayer invalid. See: al-Sharh al-Mumti’ (1/486). An example of hesitating is if he hears someone knocking at the door, and he wonders whether he should stop praying or carry on?

Thus it is clear that if a person decides to stop the act of worship, it becomes invalid, but if that was simply a thought that crossed his mind, it does not invalidate the act of worship.

Based on this, if the idea of stopping the fast simply occurs to one, it does not invalidate the fast until he decides and forms the intention to break the fast.

Similarly, if whilst doing wudoo’ he becomes uncertain as to whether urine has come out of him, and he pauses and looks, but does not intend to stop doing wudoo’, and he does not find anything, then his wudoo’ is not invalidated.

Similarly if he intends to stop doing wudoo’ his wudoo’ is invalidated, and it is not permissible for him to complete it, rather he must start all over again.

It says in al-Insaaf (1/151): If he cancels his intention whilst purifying himself, what he has already done is invalidated, according to the correct view. This was the view favoured by Ibn ‘Aqeel and by al-Majd in his commentary. And it was said that what has already been done is not invalidated thereby; this was stated by al-Musannaf in al-Mughni. End quote.

But one must beware of waswasah, because the shaytaan may come to a person and make him think that something has come out of him, and the person may get carried away with that and hardly be able to do any act of worship without doubting about it, which may cause him hardship and distress. Please see question no. 62839.

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

He wants evidence for the dhikrs that are said when bowing and prostrating

What is the proof that we can say ‘subhaana rabbi al-azeem wa bi hamhdihi’ during rukoo and ‘subhaana rabbi al-a’la wa bi hamdhihi’ during sujood?.

Praise be to Allaah.

The dhikrs that are said when bowing and prostrating are of three types:

1-     Some are common to both and are said both when bowing and prostrating

2-     Some are said only when bowing

3-     Some are said only when prostrating.

The dhikrs that are common to both include the following:

“Subhaanaka Allaahumma Rabbana wa bihamdika Allaahumma ighfir li (Glory and praise be to you O Allaah, our Lord, O Allaah forgive me).”

It was narrated that ‘Aa’ishah (may Allaah be pleased with her) said: The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) often used to say when bowing and prostrating:

“Subhaanaka Allaahumma Rabbana wa bihamdika Allaahumma ighfir li (Glory and praise be to you O Allah, our Lord, O Allaah forgive me).”

Narrated by al-Bukhaari (761) and Muslim (484).

Another dhikr that is common to both is “Subbooh Quddoos Rabb ul-malaa’ikati wa’l-Rooh (Glorified, Holy, Lord of the angels and the Spirit)”.

It was narrated from ‘Aa’ishah that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to say when bowing and prostrating: “Subbooh Quddoos Rabb ul-malaa’ikati wa’l-Rooh (Glorified, Holy, Lord of the angels and the Spirit)”. Narrated by Muslim (487).

Another common dhikr is: “Subhaana dhi’l-jabarooti wa’l-malakooti wa’l-kibriya’ wa’l-‘azamah (Glory be to the One Who has all power, dominion, magnificence and might).” Continue reading

He wants to learn the Tashahhud

My question is: I would like you to write for me the “Tashahhud” ?.

Praise be to Allaah.

These are some of the versions of the Tashahhud which are narrated from the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).

1 – Ibn Mas’ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) said: “The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) taught me the Tashahhud, holding my hand between his hands, just as he would teach me a Soorah from the Qur’aan:

‘At-tahiyyaatu Lillaahi wa’s-salawaatu wa’t-tayyibaat, as-salaamu ‘alayka ayyuha’n-Nabiyyu wa rahmat-Allaahi wa barakaatuhu. As-salaamu ‘alayna wa ‘alaa ‘ibaad-Illaah is-saaliheen. Ash-hadu an laa ilaaha ill-Allaah wa ash-hadu anna Muhammadan ‘abduhu wa rasooluhu (All compliments, prayers and pure words are due to Allaah. Peace be upon you, O Prophet, and the mercy of Allaah and His blessings. Peace be upon us, and on the righteous slaves of Allaah. I bear witness that none has the right to be worshipped except Allaah, and I bear witness that Muhammad is His slave and Messenger).’

This was whilst he was among us, but after he was taken, we would say ‘as-salaam ‘ala’n-Nabi (peace be upon the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him)).’”

(Narrated by al-Bukhaari, al-Isti’dhaan, 6265)

This is the soundest version of the wording of the Tashahhud according to the scholars. This should be said in the first Tashahhud, and in the second Tashahhud there should be added to it al-Salaah ‘ala’n-Nabi (sending blessings upon the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him)). Ibn al-Qayyim said: “It is prescribed for his ummah to send blessings upon him in the last Tashahhud.” (al-Salaah wa Hukm Taarikihaa, 1/284)

2 – The Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said:

“Say: ‘Allaahumma salli ‘ala Muhammadin wa ‘ala aali Muhammadin kamaa salayta ‘ala aali Ibraaheem, wa baarik ‘ala Muhammadin wa ‘ala aali Muhammadin kamaa baarakta ‘ala aali Ibraaheem fi’l-‘aalameen innaka Hameedun Majeed (O Allaah, send prayer upon Muhammad and upon the family of Muhammad, as You sent prayers upon the family of Ibraaheem. And send blessings upon Muhammad and upon the family of Muhammad, as You sent blessings upon the family of Ibraaheem among the nations; You are indeed Worthy of Praise, Full of Glory)’ – and the salaam is as you know.”

(Narrated by Muslim, al-Salaah, 405)

The Sunnah is to make du’aa’ (supplication) after the Tashahhud and before the tasleem (salaams). See Question # 5236. Continue reading

She wants to do tayammum instead of doing ghusl from janaabah because she feels shy in front of her husband’s family

I want to ask whether it is possible for me to do tayammum instead of doing ghusl to purify myself from janaabah, because I live with my husband’ mother and sister, and I feel embarrassed to do ghusl every day or every other day. Please note that I will resort to tayammum only once or twice a week so that those who live with me in the house will not feel that I am doing ghusl a lot.

Praise be to Allaah.

It is obligatory to do ghusl with water to cleanse oneself of janaabah, because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“O you who believe! Approach not As-Salaah (the prayer) when you are in a drunken state until you know (the meaning) of what you utter, nor when you are in a state of Janaaba (i.e. in a state of sexual impurity and have not yet taken a bath), except when travelling on the road (without enough water, or just passing through a mosque), till you wash your whole body. And if you are ill, or on a journey, or one of you comes after answering the call of nature, or you have been in contact with women (by sexual relations) and you find no water, perform Tayammum with clean earth and rub therewith your faces and hands (Tayammum). Truly, Allaah is Ever Oft-Pardoning, Oft-Forgiving”

[al-Nisa’ 4:43]

“O you who believe! When you intend to offer As-Salaah (the prayer), wash your faces and your hands (forearms) up to the elbows, rub (by passing wet hands over) your heads, and (wash) your feet up to the ankles. If you are in a state of Janaaba (i.e. after a sexual discharge), purify yourselves (bathe your whole body). But if you are ill or on a journey, or any of you comes after answering the call of nature, or you have been in contact with women (i.e. sexual intercourse), and you find no water, then perform Tayammum with clean earth and rub therewith your faces and hands. Allaah does not want to place you in difficulty, but He wants to purify you, and to complete His Favour to you that you may be thankful”

[al-Maa’idah 5:6]

And the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “ ‘Clean earth’ is the wudoo’ of the Muslim even if he cannot find water for ten years, but if he finds water then let him fear Allaah and let it touch his skin for that is good for him.” Narrated by al-Bazaar; classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh al-Jaami’, no. 3861.

It is not permissible to do tayammum unless one has an excuse for not using water, such as none being available, or if using it will cause harm, because of the verse quoted above.

With regard to not doing ghusl because you feel shy, this is not permissible and tayammum is not sufficient in this case, and prayer is not valid if you do tayammum. You should put your fear of Allaah above your fear of people, as Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“Therefore fear not men but fear Me”

[al-Maa’idah 5:44]

“Do you fear them? Allaah has more right that you should fear Him if you are believers”

[al-Tawbah 9:13]

The kind of shyness that prevents you doing obligatory actions is a blameworthy kind of shyness, indeed it is a kind of weakness and incapability. It has nothing to do with the praiseworthy kind of shyness.

In order to make you feel less embarrassed, you can do ghusl at times when they will not notice it, such as before dawn, or you can use the water in such a way that they will not hear it and no one will know that you are doing ghusl, and so on, which will help to conceal the things that may be causing you to feel shy.

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

It is not obligatory to do ghusl from janaabah when one wants to eat

Can one eat or drink before performing “Ghusal” after sexual intercourse with wife?

Praise be to Allaah.

It is not obligatory to do ghusl from janaabah when one wants to eat, rather it is Sunnah to do wudoo’ when one wants to eat. This is a matter on which there is consensus among the scholars.

The evidence for that is the hadeeth of ‘Aa’ishah (may Allaah be pleased with her), that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), when he wanted to eat or sleep at the time when he was junub (in a state of impurity following intercourse), he would do wudoo’. (Narrated by Muslim, al-Hayd, 461). Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen said in al-Sharh al-Mumti’: “It seems to me that the one who is junub should not sleep without doing wudoo’, this is mustahabb, as is also the case with regard to eating and drinking. Some of the scholars said: it is not makrooh for him to eat or drink without doing wudoo’ when he is junub.” Continue reading