The imam rushes through the prayer; can he pray at home with his sister in jamaa‘ah?

In the prayer place where I live there is a permanent imam, sometime when he is not there somone else is imam insteed of him. When he prays i dont have enough time to do al fatiha and many have complained on him, old people to, so there is no fatiha and everything else is also fast, and almost no khusho at all. only Fajr prayer is the only prayer when he is not the imam and someone else is, so that prayer can be done there.
Maghrib and isha can be done in another praying place where i live that usually has these two prayers that they pray there only and there they pray in normal speed, so i do maghrib and isha there. but duhr and asr in the prayer place with the fast imam, feels like it is no prayer and feel invalid and not right i always do my prayer again after finished praying behind the imam, sometime i fall behind in rukoo or prostration cause its to fast, so I do the prayer again and all feels very wrong.
So what im asking is can I pray duhr and asr at home with my sister instead?
I have asked my aunts husband who has studied in university of al madinah and he asked some or someone and he/they said it can be done.

Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly:

Praying in congregation in the mosque is obligatory for men who are able to do so, according to the more correct scholarly opinion, because of evidence that has been discussed previously in the answers to questions no. 8918 and 120  Continue reading

He entered the mosque and prayed on his own then left before the prayer in congregation

A person entered the mosque at the time of the adhaan for ‘Asr, then he prayed and did not wait for the iqaamah (call immediately preceding the prayer) to be given, because he had something to do. Is that permissible or is it not permissible to pray until the iqaamah for the prayer is given?.

Praise be to Allaah.

The Muslim should pray in congregation in the mosque if he is able to do so.

This has been discussed with the evidence in the answer to question no. 120

If he has an excuse, then there is nothing wrong with him praying before the congregational prayer on his own, then leaving.

One excuse is if he remembers that he has some property that he fears may be stolen, or he has a family member who is sick and he has to stay with him, or he has an appointment and will be adversely affected by not attending it, and other excuses that make it permissible to waive the duty to attend prayer in congregation.

And Allah knows best. Continue reading

Praying with tayammum is better than praying with a previous wudoo’ done using water when one is desperate to relieve oneself

I entered the mosque one day and there was water in my house to do wudoo’ for prayer, but I still had my wudoo’. However the need to relieve myself was pressing and I could not find any water, and I was afraid that I would miss the prayer in congregation, so I joined the prayer.

Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly:

It is makrooh for the worshipper to start praying when he is suppressing the need to defecate or urinate, because the Prophet (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) forbade doing that, because of what it results in of failing to attain complete focus and contemplation in prayer.  Continue reading

Attending prayers in congregation in a mosque where women are uncovered when doing wudoo’

In our Muslim country at most of the masajid here, when I go for prayer I see some women who enter the masjid after they take off their shoes in front of men. Also when they make wudu’ the fold their sleeves up and uncover apart of their lower legs and stand beside men for wudu’. What should I do? Shall I pray at home and stop going to the masjid? Especially that we are young men and have strong desires.

Praise be to Allaah.

Attending prayers in congregation with the Muslims is obligatory, as we have stated in many answers. See no. 8918 and 120. You should strive to pray in congregation in a mosque in which the call to prayer is given and you should try to do wudoo’ in your house or place of work. If you have to do wudoo’ in the mosque, then you should lower your gaze and try to keep away from places where women are, because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“Tell the believing men to lower their gaze (from looking at forbidden things), and protect their private parts (from illegal sexual acts). That is purer for them”

[al-Noor 24:30]

We also advise  believing women to fear Allaah with regard to coming to the mosque. They should realize that they are coming to a place that is one of the noblest places on earth to perform an act of worship that is one of the greatest acts of worship. So it is not befitting for them to disobey their Lord by uncovering that which He has commanded them to cover, and it is not right for her to crowd with men in the place where they do wudoo’. If they cannot find a place to do wudoo’ then they should pray in their homes and that is better for them and brings a greater reward, as it says in Sunan Abi Dawood (570) and elsewhere. It was narrated from ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Mas’ood (may Allaah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “A woman’s prayer in her house is better than her prayer in her courtyard, and her prayer in her cabinet is better than her prayer in her courtyard.” Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Saheeh Abi Dawood. Continue reading

Is there a concession allowing one who is newly married not to pray in congregation?

Is it true that the Sunnah allows one who is newly married to pray at home during the first week of marriage and not take part in congregational prayers? What is the evidence for that?.

Praise be to Allaah.

There is a great deal of evidence which shows that it is obligatory for men to pray in congregation as you will see discussed in detail in the answer to question no. 120. We do not know of any evidence that suggests that a newly married man is allowed not to pray in congregation, apart from a few fuqaha’ who stated that the one who is waiting for his bride to be brought to him is excused from praying in congregation.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked about his opinion on this and he said: We think that the views of the scholars may include those that are wrong and those that are right. What is essential is to refer to the Qur’aan and Sunnah. Continue reading

Praying ‘Isha’ behind someone who is praying Taraweeh or Witr

I missed Isha prayer once and caught up with the imam the prayer of Witr, so I followed him. He made dua then finished the Witr prayer, so I stood up and continued my Isha. Is what I did permissible? The rakah I prayed behind the imam is considered Witr or a part of ‘Isha prayer? What should I do in this case?.

Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly:

Your praying ‘Isha’ behind someone who was praying Taraweeh or Witr is valid according to the more correct of the two scholarly opinions. This issue is known to the fuqaha’ as the prayer of one who is offering an obligatory prayer behind one who is offering a naafil prayer. Ibn Qudaamah (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in al-Mughni (2/30): There are two reports concerning the prayer of one who is offering an obligatory prayer behind one who is offering a naafil prayer, one of which is that it is not valid. This view was favoured by most of our companions, and this is the view of al-Zuhri, Maalik, and ashaab al-ra’y, because the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The imam is appointed to be followed, so do not differ from him.” Agreed upon.

The other view is that it is permissible. This is the view of al-Shaafa’i and Ibn al-Mundhir. This is more correct, because of the report narrated by Jaabir ibn ‘Abd-Allaah that Mu’aadh would pray with the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), then go back and lead his people in that prayer. Agreed upon. And it is narrated that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) led a group of his companions in the fear prayer, and did two rak’ahs then said the salaam, then he led the other group in two rak’ahs then said the salaam. Narrated by Abu Dawood. The second two rak’ahs were naafil for him, but he was leading people who were offering the obligatory prayer.

As for the hadeeth that they quote, what it means is: Do not differ from the imam in his actions, based on the fact that he said: “When he bows, then bow, and when he rises from bowing then rise from bowing, and when he prostrates then prostrate, and if he prays sitting down then you should all pray sitting down.” End quote.

The scholars of the Standing Committee for Issuing Fatwas was asked: What should be done if a person comes after ‘Isha’ prayer and the prayer has ended, and the imam gets up to pray Taraweeh. Should he follow the imam with the intention of praying ‘Isha’, or should he get up and pray by himself or with a jamaa’ah (congregation) if there is one?

They replied: it is permissible for him to pray ‘Isha’ in congregation with one who is praying Taraweeh, then when the imam says the salaam after two rak’ahs, the one who is praying ‘Isha’ behind him should stand up and pray two more rak’ahs in order to complete ‘Isha’ prayer. End quote.

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah (7/402).

Shaykh Ibn Baaz (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked: If a Muslim comes to the mosque and finds the congregation praying Taraweeh, and he has not prayed ‘Isha’, should he pray with them with the intention of praying ‘Isha’?

He replied: There is nothing wrong with him praying with them with the intention of praying ‘Isha’, according to the more correct of the two scholarly opinions. When the imam says the salaam, he should stand up and complete his prayer. End quote from Majmoo’ Fataawa al-Shaykh Ibn Baaz (12/181).

Secondly:

The rak’ah that you prayed with the imam will not be counted as Witr for two reasons:

1 – You started to pray with the intention of praying ‘Isha’, so it is a rak’ah that is counted as part of ‘Isha’, and you have to complete the rest of the prayer after the imam says the salaam.

2 – Witr cannot be valid unless one has finished ‘Isha’, because of the report narrated by Imam Ahmad (23339), that the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Allaah has added a prayer for you, and it is Witr, so pray it between ‘Isha’ and Fajr.”

Classed as saheeh by al-Albaani in Silsilat al-Ahaadeeth al-Saheehah 9108).

To sum up: What you did is valid and we ask Allaah to accept it from you.

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

Holding the Mus-haf for one who is following an imaam is contrary to the Sunnah

What is the ruling on holding the Mus-haf in the case of one who is following an imaam in praying Taraaweeh in Ramadan, on the grounds that he is following the imaam’s recitation?

Praise be to Allaah.

Holding the Mus-haf for this reason is contrary to the Sunnah, for several reasons:

1.                 It prevents a person from placing his right hand over his left when standing.

2.                 It leads to a lot of unnecessary movements, such as opening the Mus-haf, closing it, and placing it under one’s arm.

3.                 These movements are very distracting to the worshipper.

4.                 It prevents the worshipper from looking at the place of sujood. Many scholars say that looking at the place of sujood is Sunnah and is better.

5.                 The one who does that may forget that he is in prayer, unless his heart is properly focused upon his being in prayer, unlike when he is standing in a humble and focused manner with his right hand upon his left, tilting his head towards the place of sujood. In this case he will be more likely to remember that he is praying and that he is behind the imaam. Continue reading

Should the worshippers stand up when they hear the iqaamah or in the middle of it or at the end of it?

When the muazzin starts to call some brothers stand up and starts to arrange the rows and some brothers still wait where they are till the muazzin calls “qadqamathisalah” , So What is the authentic way? .

Praise be to Allaah.

The matter is broad in scope and a person may stand up at the beginning of the iqaamah or in the middle of it or after it finishes. The majority of scholars are of the view that if the imam is in the mosque, they should not stand up until the iqaamah ends.

Imam Maalik (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in al-Muwatta’: With regard to people standing up when the iqaamah for prayer is given, I have not heard anything definitive concerning that, but I think it depends on what the people are able to do, because there are heavy and light ones among them and they are not all able to stand up at the same time. End quote.

Al-Haafiz said in al-Fath: The majority are of the view that if the imam is with them in the mosque, they should not stand up until the iqaamah ends. It was narrated that Anas used to stand up when the muezzin said “Qad qaamat il-salaah (prayer is about to begin)”; narrated by Ibn al-Mundhir and others. It was also narrated by Sa’eed ibn Mansoor via Abu Ishaaq that the companions of ‘Abd-Allaah (i.e., Ibn Mas’ood, may Allaah be pleased with him) also did that. It was narrated that Sa’eed ibn al-Musayyib said: When the muezzin says “Allaahu akbar” one must stand up. When he says “Hayya ‘ala al-‘salaah (come to prayer), the rows should be straightened, and when he says “Laa ilaaha ill-Allaah” the imam should say takbeer (to start the prayer). But if the imam is not in the mosque, the majority are of the view that they should not stand up until they see him. End quote.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) was asked: Is there any mention in the Sunnah of a specific point in the iqaamah when people should stand up for the prayer?

He replied: There is no mention in the Sunnah of a specific point in the iqaamah when people should stand up for the prayer, but the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “Do not stand up until you see me.” Agreed upon. If a person stands up at the beginning of the iqaamah or during it or when it ends, all of that is permissible. End quote from Majmoo’ Fataawa al-Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (13/16).

And Allaah knows best. Continue reading

He has polio and he does not pray in congregation sometimes

I am a person who has polio. Praise be to Allaah, I usually pray in the mosque but sometimes I pray at home because I sleep late. I also often pray Zuhr at home. Is there any sin on me?.

Praise be to Allaah.

Praying in congregation is obligatory for men who are able for it, whether they are in their home town or travelling, according to the more correct of the two scholarly opinions, because of a great deal of evidence, which has been quoted in the answers to questions no. 8918 and 120.

If you are able to go to the mosque, then praying in congregation is obligatory for you. You said that you usually pray in the mosque, praise be to Allaah. This by the grace of Allaah and His blessing to you. So strive to show gratitude for it, for gratitude increases the blessing, as Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“If you give thanks (by accepting Faith and worshipping none but Allaah), I will give you more (of My Blessings)”

[Ibraaheem 14:7]. Continue reading

Ruling on holding a second congregational prayer in the mosque

There has arisen a fitnah (conflict) in the mosque which has spread among the brothers. The problem is holding a second congregational prayer (jamaa’ah) after the first congregational prayer in the mosque which has a regular imam. Some brother objected to that to such a degree that they wanted to prevent it. I hope that you can offer us much-needed advice.

Praise be to Allaah.

Several scenarios may apply to holding a second congregational prayer in the mosque, some of which are not allowed and some are permissible.

The kind which we should agree is forbidden is when this second congregational prayer is held with prior agreement among these people, such as if they agree to come to the mosque after the imam has finished praying, then they pray in congregation. Similarly forbidden is when this second prayer in congregation is something that happens regularly in the mosque, in a systematic fashion, such as if it is said for example: The first congregational prayer will be held at such and such a time, and the second will be held at such and such a time, and this is something that is done regularly.

There is no dispute that these two scenarios are haraam, because they are causing disunity among the Muslims and discouraging the people from attending the first congregational prayer.

But if the second congregational prayer is held in the mosque on an occasional basis without any prior agreement, such as if a group of people enters the mosque after the imam has finished the prayer and they pray in congregation, then there is a difference of opinion among the scholars concerning this. The correct view is that it is permissible and is in fact mustahabb, because it brings the reward of praying in congregation.

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allaah have mercy on him) said, describing the scenarios of a second congregational prayer in the mosque: As for the first scenario, if there are always two congregations in the mosque, the first congregation and the second congregation, undoubtedly this is makrooh, if not haraam, because it is bid’ah (an innovation), and it was unknown at the time of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and his companions. Continue reading